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Compiling 2010 election results

Thanks again to everyone who either ran for office as a Libertarian, or voted Libertarian. We'll be compiling results and working to try to provide statistics to compare 2010 results to past results. At first glance, our results seem about average for the Libertarian Party. In the meantime, we'll be posting various snippets of information on this blog entry.

Note that everything here is based on preliminary results. Numbers are likely to change as additional votes are counted.

Currently we have 15 Libertarians for U.S. House who received over 5% of the vote. (That only counts races where a Republican and a Democrat both appeared on the ballot.) That's a big increase from past years. In 2008, three Libertarians for U.S. House got more than 5%. In 2006, one candidate; in 2004, two candidates.

15 candidates with over 5%:
Carlos Rodriguez (California Dist. 28, 8.04%)
Chard Reid (Indiana Dist. 5, 7.74%)
Edward Gonzalez (California Dist. 16, 7.64%)
Marc Johnston (Ohio Dist. 2, 6.84%)
Jeffery J. Blevins (Ohio Dist. 16, 6.63%)
Nicole Patti (Arizona Dist. 1, 6.44%)
Kevin Craig (Missouri Dist. 7, 6.22%)
Mark Lambert (California Dist. 42, 6.00%)
Mike Fellows (Montana at-large, 6.00%)
Brian Smith (Ohio Dist. 5, 5.69%)
Greg "No Bull" Knott (Indiana Dist. 9, 5.48%)
Herb Peters (California Dist. 36, 5.46%)
John Duncan (Indiana Dist. 4, 5.22%)
Bill Collins (Texas Dist. 16, 5.08%)
Ed Mishou (Texas Dist. 27, 5.04%)

In 2000, Libertarian Carla Howell ran for U.S. Senate in Massachusetts (against both Republican and Democrat) and got 11.88% of the vote. Since then, no Libertarian running for U.S. Senate (against both Republican and Democrat) has gotten more than 4%, until this year: Rebecca Sink-Burris got 5.33% in Indiana, and David Nolan got 4.68% in Arizona.

Currently, the vote total for all Libertarians for U.S. House is 988,405.

These are the Libertarian candidates we're aware of who got over 200,000 votes:
Richard B. Sanders - Washington Supreme Court - 941,845 (nonpartisan race) added 11/15/10
J. Randell Stevens - Texas Court of Criminal Appeals - 682,753
Dave Howard - Texas Court of Criminal Appeals - 659,914
Pamela Brown - California Lt. Governor - 426,594   
Mary J. Ruwart - Texas Comptroller - 416,708
Richard Bronstein - California Insurance Commissioner - 278,555
Bob Roddis - Michigan Supreme Court - 263,571 (nonpartisan race) <--recently added
Andrew Favor - California Controller - 214,474

We've gotten a few reports of candidates who won their elections (these were non-partisan elections):
Kathy Woolsey for Charleston County (SC) Soil and Water Commission - 53%
Jim Culberson for Sebastian Inlet Tax District (FL) - 62%
Ron Skrutski for Lee County (FL) Soil and Water Conservation District - unopposed
Tom Clark for Lee County (FL) Soil and Water Conservation District - unopposed
Kim Hawk for Lee County (FL) Soil and Water Conservation District - unopposed

Richard Winger of Ballot Access News has posted an article about ballot access results from this election. Read the article.

In Wayne County, Indiana, Cheryl Heacox was elected to the Clay Township Board. (It was a partisan "vote for 3" election, and she was one of the three candidates elected.)

In Alaska, Scott Kohlhaas received 30% of the vote running for State Representative, District 20. (There was no Republican in the race.)

In Maricopa County, Arizona, Rachel Kielsky received 34.95% running for Justice of the Peace, and Michael Kielsky received 25.47% running for County Attorney. (There was no Democrat in either race.)

In California, Gary Bryant received 9.04% running for State Assembly, District 3. (Note to LP News readers: Gary Bryant was featured on the back page of the most recent LP News.)

In Arizona, Scott Stewart was re-elected to the Pima Community College Board for a six-year term. (Non-partisan race.)

In Iowa, Christopher Peters received 25.22% running for State Senator, District 15. (There was no Republican in the race.)

In Massachusetts, Jonathan Loya received 28.74% running for State Representative in Middlesex County. (There was no Republican in the race.)

In Wicomico County, Maryland, Mike Calpino received 30.37% running for County Council. (There was no Democrat in the race.)

In Missouri, Sean O'Toole received 33.42% running for State Representative, District 40. (There was no Republican in the race.)

In Montana, Dan Cox received 11.91% running for State Senator, District 44.

In Pennsylvania, Tim Mullen received 14.91% running for State Representative, District 120.

In Nevada, Sandra Darby got 41.25% running for Nye County Commissioner. (There was no Democrat in the race.)

In Wisconsin, Wil Losch got 10.02% running for State Assembly, District 34.

In Indiana, Ron Cenkush received 27.97% running for State Representative, District 5. (There was no Republican in the race.) Brad Hyatt received 31.57% running for State Representative, District 56 (no Republican in the race).

Also in Indiana, Rex Bell received 20.79% running for State Representative, District 54 (against both a Republican and a Democrat).

Also in Indiana, Bob Isgrigg received 37.87% running for Clark County Surveyor. (There was no Republican in the race.) Jon Bell received 31.02% running for Henry County Council. (No Democrat in the race.) In Wayne County, Matthew Hisrich got 28.37% running for County Commissioner (no Democrat), Mark Harris got 25.19% running for County Council (no Democrat), and Gayle Bond got 18.90% running for County Council (against both a Republican and a Democrat).

In West Virginia, Tom Thacker received 10.66% running for State Senator, District 11.

In Missouri, Steve Murphy received 31.76% running for Clark County Presiding Commissioner (against both a Republican and a Democrat).

In Henry County, Indiana, Steve Coffman was re-elected to the Liberty Township Advisory Board.

In St. Joseph County, Indina, Thomas Zmyslo received 15.49% running for County Council (against both a Republican and a Democrat).

In North Carolina, John Sams received 35.54% running for Chowan County Commissioner. (There was no Republican in the race.)

In Washington, Richard B. Sanders received 49.85% running for re-election in a nonpartisan race for Supreme Court. (As of 11/15/10, he has not conceded but is "not optimistic" about winning.)