2016 Federal Candidate Pledges

See also: Local Candidate Pledges | State Candidate Pledges

Scores of Libertarian candidates for federal office pledge to boldly reduce the size, scope, authority, and taxation of Big Government.

The pledges they’ve made are listed below.

Please click the “More” option for each to see the list of 2016 Libertarian Candidates who have made the pledge as well as the benefits and the reasoning behind each measure.

End Crony Capitalism

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to end government bailouts, grants, loans, loan guarantees, and other handouts to private businesses; eliminate unnecessary government spending, which fuels crony capitalism; open up bidding of government contracts; and require all government contractors and their employees to agree to abstain from lobbying or from promoting or opposing political campaigns.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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What is crony capitalism – and why must we end it?

In a marketplace that’s free of onerous government fees, rules and regulations, businesses are free to innovate and to make and sell their goods and services. Customers are free to buy, or not buy.

With crony capitalism, politicians interfere with this process by doling out favors to well-connected businesses:

  • lucrative government contracts
  • direct handouts (corporate welfare)
  • government mandates that force people to buy their products – whether or not they want or need them
  • tax incentives, regulations and red tape designed to give those businesses an unfair advantage or drive their competitors out of business

What does the politician get out of it? Campaign donations. Jobs for his family, friends, and allies. Secret, insider investment information. A plush job when he retires.

Whether the politician solicits the business or the business lobbies the politician, everybody else loses:

  • Competitors, often small businesses, are knocked out of business and their employees are thrown out of work.
  • Customers are forced to pay higher prices and endure worse service.
  • Customers are forced to accept lower-quality, less safe products and services.

What will happen when we end crony capitalism?

  • Ending government bailouts and corporate handouts will allow for huge, immediate, direct tax cuts — giving back desperately-needed money to American families — every year — to spend, save, or give away as they see fit.
  • Better quality, safer goods at lower prices will put hundreds of billions of dollars back into family budgets and improve everyone’s quality of life.
  • Small businesses will thrive, creating millions of productive, sustainable jobs.
  • Fewer lobbyists will make politicians more responsive to the wants and needs of American citizens and taxpayers.
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Eliminate the Federal Income Tax

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to eliminate the federal income tax, cut federal spending to the level it was during Bill Clinton’s presidency, balance the budget, and get the IRS off the backs of taxpayers.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why end the income tax and cut federal spending to the level it was during Bill Clinton’s presidency

  • Ending the income tax and cutting spending will stop the growth of the perilously-high national debt — without raising taxes.
  • It will give back, on average, over $11,000 to each American family — every year — that they can invest, save, spend, or give away as they see fit.
  • It will pour over $1.4 trillion into the productive, private-sector economy, stimulating massive investment in small businesses and creating tens of millions of new private-sector jobs.
  • Ending deficit spending will stop the devaluation of the dollar and will stabilize prices, preserving American wealth.
  • Cutting spending will force politicians to eliminate destructive federal programs, regulations, and bureaucracies that do more harm than good. Examples include: stifling business regulations, the prohibition of marijuana, unnecessary foreign wars, and thousands of frivolous projects best left to the private sector (e.g., promoting the Hawaiian Chocolate Festival).
  • Ending the income tax will create a boom in charitable giving. This puts trillions of dollars back in the hands of American taxpayers, enabling them to take care of others in need through their churches and private charities, and by giving directly to help friends, family, and community members in need.
  • Ending the income tax will end wasteful bookkeeping needed to comply with IRS tax filings and audits, saving Americans 6 billion hours of their precious time and up to $378 billion in accounting costs — every year.
  • Ending the income tax and cutting spending will abort the Democrats’ and Republicans’ plan to add another $5 trillion over the next eight years to the nation’s nearly $20 trillion federal government debt, sparing future generations from footing a bill they played no part in creating.
  • Ending the income tax will free up billions of dollars for Americans to spend on music, entertainment, crafts, and the arts, enabling talented individuals who are now unemployed or working in jobs they don’t like to pursue doing what they love for a living.
  • Cutting spending will force politicians to eliminate government waste.
  • Cutting spending will stop the growth in the interest due on the federal debt, now approaching $300 billion per year. This will help minimize this expense if interest rates ever rise, which is likely.
  • Demanding government financial responsibility will restore America’s reputation as the envy of the world, demonstrating that the American experiment of free, unfettered trade creates prosperity and alleviates poverty. This will set an example for poor countries, and help them rise from hardship to abundance.
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Shut Down NSA, TSA and End Mass Surveillance

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to reduce and consolidate our 18 spy agencies, abolish the NSA and the TSA, grant clemency and full whistleblower protection to Edward Snowden, repeal all laws that violate the Fourth Amendment right to privacy, and cut taxes by the amount saved.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota

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Benefits of fully restoring the Fourth Amendment, exonerating Edward Snowden, shrinking American spy apparatus

  • Privacy! No more snooping around your private e-mail, phone calls, text messages, Skype sessions, and other personal communication without your consent. No risk of embarrassment, humiliation, or risk to your relationships or your career, due to the government’s unwelcome intrusion into your personal life. You alone will control your private information.
  • Consolidating the 18 U.S. spy agencies will enable substantial cuts in federal taxes. Each American family will get back, on average, hundreds of dollars every year that they now pay in taxes.
  • Assurance of privacy will increase use of online banking and shopping, creating greater convenience for shoppers and increased sales for online vendors.
  • Privacy encourages use of e-mail, which cuts costs for businesses, cuts prices for consumers, liberates personal communications, and reduces paper waste.
  • Protection from warrantless government search and seizure will greatly reduce the risk of unjust arrests and prosecution of innocent Americans, and will lessen the risk of America devolving into a state of tyranny.
  • Exonerating Edward Snowden will grant him the respect and freedom he deserves, and will make it safe for whistleblowers to speak up when the government violates the rights of citizens. This ensures that political dissidents are free to peacefully express their opinions without retaliation by adversaries.
  • Streamlined intelligence will increase transparency and congressional oversight, ensuring spy activities are lawful and do not violate individual rights while maintaining necessary confidentiality of classified information.
  • Ending the TSA will make air travel dignified, lower-cost, safer, faster, and more convenient.
  • People who now avoid flying because of the TSA will travel more. Family members will see more of their loved ones who live afar.
  • Returning control of air travel security to the airlines will free them to insure all contents of lost or damaged luggage — now restricted to just clothing and toiletries. Passengers will be free to pack valuables in checked luggage, knowing they won’t be stolen by a TSA employee. No more lugging heavy valuables on planes to guard against a loss.
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End the Failed Drug Prohibition

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to immediately end the insane War on Drugs; pardon, release from prison, and expunge the records of all non-violent drug ‘offenders’; end arrests and SWAT raids on suspected drug ‘offenders,’ abolish the federal Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and cut taxes by the amount saved.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why we should end the failed War on Drugs

  • The War on Drugs has proven far more deadly and destructive than drugs themselves.
  • Alcohol Prohibition prompted organized crime, consumption of stronger alcoholic drinks, and an epidemic of alcohol overdose deaths.
  • Likewise, Drug Prohibition has prompted the formation of deadly street gangs, use of stronger drugs, and an increase in drug overdose deaths.
  • Because of the Drug War, the United States incarcerates more people per capita than any country on earth. More than 500,000 Americans are now serving time in jail or prison for drug “offenses.” They are peaceful citizens, separated from their children and families, who could be living productive lives.
  • The incarceration of peaceful drug offenders has cost taxpayers more than $1 trillion since 1971.
  • More than 600,000 people are arrested every year for mere possession of marijuana, diverting attention from where it should be: on violent criminals.
  • Marijuana prohibition denies those suffering from cancer, AIDS, migraines, glaucoma, seizures, and other serious diseases their right to an effective treatment that both reduces suffering and saves lives.
  • Democrats and Republicans enacted the failed War on Drugs, escalated it, and continue to defend it. It is indefensible.
  • Continuing the failed and immoral War on Drugs sends the wrong message to kids:
    – Incarcerate people who have harmed no one else.
    – Deprive people with serious illnesses of the medicine they need.
    – Stubbornly continue failed policies while crime rages and millions suffer.
    – Be hypocrites, drinking alcohol while banning milder substances.
  • Kids can see through this irresponsible message. It encourages them to discredit and disregard good advice.
  • When Drug Prohibition ends, crime will go down dramatically, making our streets and homes safer.
  • People now in prison who never harmed another human being will be free to go home to their families. Their children will grow up with their mom or dad at home.
  • Law enforcement will focus more on finding and prosecuting murderers, rapists, and thieves.
  • Each taxpayer will get back hundreds of dollars — every year — that they now spend on today’s failed prohibition. Money they can save, spend, or give away to others in need.
  • People suffering from cancer, AIDS, and other serious diseases will have dignified and safe access to medical marijuana, giving them their best chance for a long and healthy life.
  • Ending the War on Drugs sends the right message to kids:
    – Be personally responsible.
    – Be just, be reasonable, and honor individual rights.
    – Admit mistakes and get rid of bad laws that don’t work.
    – End unnecessary human suffering.
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Downsize the Military

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to cut military spending by 60 percent or more and and cut taxes by the amount saved; close all foreign U.S. military bases; withdraw completely from the Middle East; and bring our troops home.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why we should dramatically downsize the U.S. military

  • Cutting the U.S. military by 60 percent does not remove one cent of U.S. military defense spending — only military offense, defense of other countries, and waste. This will leave more than enough to defend the American people, our soils, and our shores against foreign attackers and invaders.
  • An oversized military budget is a war waiting to happen. Needless war results in untold death and destruction — the greatest assault on human liberty. A lean, reasonably-sized military budget will save lives, avoid casualties, preserve personal property and community infrastructures, and foster peace.
  • Fewer casualties will reduce demand on the Veterans Administration, which will improve the care of America’s wounded soldiers.
  • Cutting the military by 60 percent will enable substantial cuts in federal taxes and stop the growth of the national debt. If applied to the income tax, each American family will get back, on average, thousands of dollars every year. If used to balance the budget, it will eliminate most of the deficit and stop today’s rapid inflation of the dollar. This will stabilize prices on everyday goods and services and dramatically reduce the risk of an economic collapse.
  • A non-interventionist foreign policy will result in less hostility towards the United States and reduce the risk of a terrorist attack.
  • There is no justification for forcing U.S. taxpayers to fund the military defense of other nations, including wealthy countries such as France, Germany and Japan.
  • The U.S. has the largest nuclear arsenal in the world. It is extremely unlikely that any country would attack the U.S. by conventional means.
  • Downsizing the military will force the reduction and consolidation of 18 separate spy agencies — the surest way to end the government’s spying on innocent citizens in violation of the Fourth Amendment.
  • Voters want to downsize the U.S. military. According to a survey by the Stimson Center, Democratic, Republican and independent voters all want to cut military spending “far more severely than the sequester would [have]” and “far, far more severely than either party has proposed.”
  • A right-sized military will be auditable, will squeeze out its legendary waste and will put an end to overpriced and unneeded multi-billion-dollar procurements that politicians lobby for to “bring home the bacon” to their districts.
  • Closing foreign bases and withdrawing from the Middle East means that U.S. troops stationed abroad can come home to their families. Kids will grow up with mom and dad at home.
  • A non-interventionist policy will reduce trade barriers, resulting in greater prosperity for both Americans and our trading partners.
  • Transferring wealth out of the government sector and into the private sector will create sustainable, productive jobs — approximately twice as many jobs as will be lost in the government sector. A net increase of millions of new jobs.
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Localize Education

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to quickly end all federal mandates on state and local schools, discontinue Common Core and all other Department of Education programs, close the DOE, and cut taxes by the amount saved.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Steven A. Hohe, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why we should localize education

  • Today’s centrally planned education handed down by the federal Department of Education (D.O.E.) drives up the cost of schools and property taxes while worsening educational outcomes.
  • The D.O.E. drowns teachers in red tape, forcing them to spend, on average, two hours every day jumping through bureaucratic hoops — time they could spend helping kids learn.
  • The federal D.O.E. contributes 11 cents of every dollar spent on local schools but imposes 15 cents in strings attached.
  • State and local taxpayers are forced to fund the difference, largely in higher property taxes that drive up rent and the cost of owing a home.
  • Since the D.O.E. began operating in 1980, the per pupil cost of public schooling has risen dramatically.
  • Since the D.O.E. began operating, graduation rates and functional literacy rates in the U.S. have remained low or fallen.
  • Since the D.O.E. began operating, American students have fallen behind over a dozen other countries in average scholastic aptitude testing.
  • After a decade of implementing No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the D.O.E. flunked a test set by its own standards. The Center on Education Policy reported that in 2011, 48 percent of U.S. schools did not meet academic standards set by NCLB.
  • One-size-fits-all schooling ignores the great diversity of individual educationally needs and methods that suit each child.
  • Teachers, parents and local communities know and love their children and have the greatest stake in their receiving a quality education.
  • Localizing education will free teachers to teach as they know best and to provide kids with the education they need for a bright future.
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Fully Restore the Right of Self-Defense

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to repeal all federal laws that abridge an individual’s right of self-defense, including the ‘Gun-Free’ Schools Act, and thereby remove this obstacle to citizens who can prevent or stop mass shootings.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why we should end restrictions on self-defense

  • The right of self-defense both deters and thwarts crime, minimizing the harm that criminals can inflict on innocent, law-abiding citizens.
  • There is no such thing as a “gun-free” zone. Murderers don’t care about gun regulations. They take guns wherever they please. Only innocent, law-abiding citizens obey such laws, leaving them defenseless.
  • There are only two types of zones possible: one where bad guys go unchallenged, and one where law-abiding citizens can take them down.
  • Taking away the right of self-defense puts innocent men, women, and children in harm’s way.
  • Studies show that violent-crime rates are lower where citizens have the right to keep and bear arms.
  • Anti-gun laws result in more violence: more murders, more rape, more assault, more muggings, more home invasions, and more theft.
  • Blaming guns for murder is like blaming a pencil for a misspelling.
  • Repealing anti-self-defense laws will make America safer.
  • To reduce violence even more, end the drug prohibition. XX percent of all violent crimes are linked to the War on Drugs.
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Nullify and Void Bureaucratic Regulations

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to nullify and void all regulations, laws, and restrictions generated by federal government bureaucracies.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota

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Why we must nullify and void bureaucracy-mandated regulations

  • Politicians grant vast powers to thousands of bureaucracies at all levels of government.
  • Bureaucrats impose millions of regulations on Americans that were not put to a vote by elected bodies.
  • People and businesses cannot possibly keep abreast of, much less comply with, today’s high volume of government regulations. This makes criminals out of ordinary citizens.
  • The average American unwittingly commits three felonies every day due to government over-regulation.
  • By requiring congress to vote on every regulation, and getting rid of those not put to a vote, the volume will go down to a much more reasonable and manageable level.
  • Government regulations drown businesses and citizens in red tape, causing waste and frustration.
  • Government regulations force Americans to spend $3-4 trillion every year for compliance. This is the cost of bookkeeping, financial advisers, lawyers, armies of bean counters, and the inefficiencies that regulations cause.
  • Most government regulations are not needed. Where they don’t exist, market regulators step in to keep products and services safe, effective, and competitively priced.
  • Market regulators take many forms including media watchdogs, customer feedback and ratings for products and services, user forums, and professional societies that certify suppliers.
  • For example, Underwriters Laboratory (UL) sets standards for electrical safety. Virtually every electrical vendor conforms to UL standards. No government was involved in UL’s formation or its decades of success.
  • Government regulations are typically outdated, wasteful, clumsy and nonsensical. They make products and services less safe, sometimes even dangerous.
  • Market regulations respond quickly to changes in the marketplace and result in much better, safer products and services.
  • The high cost of government bureaucracies raises government spending, taxes, and debt.
  • Getting rid of bureaucracies will enable dramatic reductions in government spending, tax cuts, and less government debt.
  • Government regulations kill millions of American jobs.
  • Getting rid of regulations will make it easy for small businesses to open and expand, creating jobs. An economic boom will result.
  • Government regulations drive up the cost of food, clothing, household items, and virtually everything Americans buy.
  • Removing government regulations will allow U.S. businesses to lower prices for consumers.
  • Over-regulation makes American businesses inability to compete in world markets.
  • Getting rid of regulations will make America competitive.
  • Bureaucracies that mandate regulations often enforce them as well, violating individual rights and due process.
  • Nullifying and voiding bureaucratic regulations will restore due process, protecting individual rights.
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Opt out of Social Security

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation that allows wage earners to opt out of Social Security. Lost revenue needed for existing and future retirees will be derived from selling tens of trillions of dollars’ worth of unneeded federal assets.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why you should be allowed to opt out of Social Security

  • If you’re self-employed, you pay a punishing 15.3% of your wages in Social Security (FICA) tax – on top of income taxes and many other taxes.
  • If you’re a W-2 worker, you pay half this amount. Your employer pays the other half. Either way, it reduces your take-home pay by a similar amount because employers take it out of the wages they pay.
  • The payout you get from Social Security is much lower than it would be if you could keep the money you earn and invest it on your own, such as in the stock market.
  • The FICA tax reduces the number of people employers can hire, resulting in fewer American jobs.
  • The government keeps all the money you’ve paid into Social Security when you die, even if you never collect a dime, leaving nothing for your spouse or children.
  • If you were allowed to keep that money, you could leave it to your loved ones when you die.
  • Eliminating the FICA tax would provide a huge, immediate increase in take-home pay for workers.
  • Allowing workers to opt out of Social Security would result in higher retirement income for retirees.
  • Eliminating the FICA tax would relieve employers of costly administrative overhead, making American businesses more competitive, which would lead to more jobs.
  • Selling tens of trillions of dollars of unneeded federal assets (land, real estate, inventory, mineral rights, etc.) and putting the proceeds into fully private accounts of people near or in retirement who are dependent on Social Security would allow us to end the FICA tax on workers while leaving seniors better off and more financially secure.
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Expand Health Freedom to Make it Affordable, Safe, and Effective

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to get the federal government out of the health care business so that it can be dramatically more effective, safer, easily affordable, and far more responsive to individual needs. Specifically:

• End all federal mandates on individuals and businesses to buy medical insurance, including those contained in Obamacare. End associated tax penalties.

• End all coverage mandates and restrictions on health insurance that prevent companies from selling policies that customers want to buy. Enable purchase of medical insurance plans across state lines. Existing policies may be honored until the free market is restored.

• End government guarantees, subsidies and bailouts of insurance companies, including ‘risk corridors.’

• End all federal laws and regulations that restrict use, or that drive up the cost, of drugs, medical supplies and equipment, and other health care products and services. This includes ending all regulatory powers of the Food and Drug Administration.

• Require states receiving federal Medicaid funds to similarly end all state mandates and regulations on medical care, including those on insurance, drugs, procedures, medical supplies and equipment, office visits, or laboratory tests.

• Once the market has been freed and prices plummet, quickly end all federal health care programs and subsidies, which will no longer be needed. Dramatically cut taxes and/or the deficit by the amount saved.

• Give veterans total control over their health care by putting money into individual health savings accounts to cover their lifelong medical costs for physical, emotional, or mental injuries resulting from combat. Shut down the Veterans Administration (VA).

• Privatize all federally-funded medical research and return every dollar saved to taxpayers.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:
Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why we should replace Big Government Medicine with health freedom

  • Government regulations, red tape, mandates, and subsidies drive up the cost of medical care astronomically. Americans pay perhaps five to ten times more for medical care and medical insurance than necessary.
  • In a competitive marketplace free of government interference, health care costs plummet to a fraction of what Americans spend today.
  • Low-cost, efficient medical providers would emerge, such as “Stitches R Us” or “Surgeries R Us,” which would offer easily-affordable options for routine procedures.
  • Most people wouldn’t need or want insurance, because even catastrophic care would be affordable for most Americans.
  • For others, catastrophic care insurance would cost a fraction of today’s premiums.
  • Out-of-pocket costs for office visits, drugs, lab tests, and procedures would be a fraction of what Americans pay today.
  • Low prices would enable phasing out of budget-busting Medicare and Medicaid programs, enabling a balanced budget and dramatically reduced federal taxes.
  • The quality and safety of health care would surge, with greater competition.
  • Patients would be far better informed.
  • Patients would be in full control of their health care, with the option of delegating that control to whomever they chose.
  • Today, thousands of government bureaucrats have access to Americans’ personal medical records.
  • In a free-market health system, patients would have full control over their medical privacy.
  • The quality of health care would rise dramatically while the frequency of medical malpractice would diminish.
  • Better quality health care would result in less suffering, shorter waits for medical treatment, better outcomes, and longer, healthier lives.
  • Medical research would accelerate discovery of cures and treatments for human disease, resulting in longer lives and less suffering.
  • Veterans would get the high-quality health care they deserve, without long waits.
  • People suffering from disease, including the terminally ill, would be free to use experimental drugs, giving them every chance to live long and healthy lives.
  • Lobbyists representing medical insurance companies, pharmaceuticals, or medical cartels would have no business in Washington, D.C. Instead, health-care delivery would be driven by the needs of patients who seek to maximize their health, and by businesses and charities that fulfill those needs.
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Replace Privileged Government Pensions with Social Security

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to move all government employees and retirees from privileged, lucrative government pensions into Social Security, and to cut taxes by the amount saved. If it’s good enough for Americans, it’s good enough for government employees.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota

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Why we should replace privileged government pensions with Social Security

  • Many government employee pensions are sweetheart deals.
  • In contrast, Social Security leaves millions of private-sector retirees, who must pay for the lucrative retirement packages of government employees, in poverty.
  • Politicians gouge the paychecks of private sector workers. They must pay the 7.65% FICA tax, as do their employers.
  • Self-employed Americans must pay 15.3% in FICA tax on their earnings.
  • Politicians levy the FICA tax on top of federal, state, and local income taxes.
  • For many working class Americans, the FICA tax is the highest tax they pay.
  • Many state and local government workers are exempt from paying the FICA tax. Others pay it but also receive a special government worker retirement benefit. Many of them, especially those close to retirement or in retirement, have contributed relatively little towards their own retirement.
  • Private-sector workers would be far better off saving or investing the money they and their employer must pay in FICA taxes for a comfortable and secure retirement. But politicians allow this only for certain government workers. This isn’t fair.
  • Every year, politicians raid the Social Security Trust Fund to pay for bloated government spending, squandering the money entrusted to them for the retirement of private-sector employees.
  • Politicians don’t touch the retirement funds of government workers. Government pensions are funded, on average, 80% nationwide (over $5 trillion saved) and are relatively secure.
  • American workers should not have to pay to ensure government employee retirements are funded when their own fund is broke.
  • Private-sector workers who depend on Social Security may retire at age 66 or 67 to receive full benefits.
  • Many government workers are eligible to retire on full benefits at age 62 or younger, depending on the agency they work for.
  • There’s no reason government workers should retire earlier than the private-sector employees who pay for their retirement.
  • Many government retirees get lucrative, automatic cost of living adjustment (COLA) increases every year.
  • Social security payouts increase at the pleasure of Congress, which tends to raise payouts only every few years.
  • Private-sector workers on Social Security who have no protection against inflation should not have to fund government workers’ COLA increases.
  • Many full-time government workers get pensions of $50,000 per year or more.
  • The maximum private sector payout for retirees on Social Security is $25,224 per year if retired at age 62; $31,668 if retired at 66 (soon to increase to 67); and $42,912 if retired at age 70.
  • Some government workers who retire in their early sixties get paid four times more than the maximum Social Security payout of those who retire at age 70.
  • There’s no justification for forcing private-sector workers, many of whom will retire in poverty, to pay for lucrative government-employee pensions.
  • Government retirees also typically get generous health-care benefits.
  • Many government retirees also get large lump-sum payments for unused sick days and vacation time.
  • The inequity between government pensions and Social Security payouts is not just grossly inequitable in one way (payouts). It’s inequitable and unfair in six additional ways: (1) Age of retirement, (2) amounts workers pay into retirement, (3) saved funds that back the payout, (4) automatic COLA increases, (5) medical benefits, and (6) accrued vacation and sick leave payouts.
  • Private-sector workers should not have to pay for lucrative, government-retiree perks.
  • Replacing lucrative government worker retirement deals with the same deal that private-sector workers get on Social Security will restore fairness.
  • Retirement fairness will reduce a huge liability for current and future taxpayers.
  • Retirement fairness will reduce the incentive for lobbyists to protect millions of unneeded government jobs, reducing taxes and deficits.
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Impose Term Limits

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass a constitutional amendment to impose term limits on U.S. representatives, U.S. senators, and federal judges.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota

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Why we should term-limit Congress and the federal judiciary

  • Incumbent politicians have numerous advantages over challengers, including name recognition, seniority, franking privileges, and large war chests funded by special interests.
  • As a result, many politicians become deeply entrenched and near impossible to unseat removing their need to compete in elections. Sometimes they refuse to debate their opponents.
  • A growing number of incumbents go completely unchallenged. No other names appear on the ballot for their race.
  • Lack of competition in elections for public office severely undermines democracy, giving voters very little say in policy decisions.
  • Long-term incumbents grant undue influence to special interests due to the deep ties they establish with their lobbyists. This further diminishes the influence of everyday Americans.
  • Long-term incumbents develop ties with mainstream media, giving both incumbents and media elitists more influence in elections. This also diminishes the influence of everyday voters.
  • Imposing term limits will foster competition and representative government that serves the people, not special interests.
  • No one is entitled to rule over another person, nor to elect someone who can rule over another. Term limits are a reasonable and necessary restraint on government power.
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Replace Government Meddling in Money with Marketplace Discipline

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to end the Federal Reserve System (the Fed); prohibit more government debt; prohibit printing of dollars not backed by physical commodities; remove restrictions on alternative currencies, e.g., Bitcoin, gold, silver; and allow the free market to set interest rates.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Tom Bagwell, U.S. House of Representatives District 12, Michigan
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota

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Why replace government meddling in money with marketplace discipline

  • By issuing debt, printing money, and controlling interest rates, the Federal Reserve (Fed) enables massive federal government spending, which has more than doubled since Bill Clinton left office in 2000.
  • Federal politicians dole out over half a trillion dollars to state and local governments every year — enabling them to overspend as well.
  • Overspending drives up federal, state, and local taxes, including sales, income, and property taxes.
  • Overspending has allowed politicians to rack up nearly $20 trillion in federal debt. This is unsustainable.
  • Overspending has allowed politicians to rack up and tens of trillions in unfunded liabilities. This is unsustainable.
  • Reckless government overspending depletes American prosperity and puts the wealth of all Americans at risk.
  • Forbidding more government debt will put the brakes on government overspending.
  • Prohibiting more government debt and allowing competition in currency will force politicians to rein in spending and stabilize the dollar, preserving American wealth.
  • Reduced spending will pave the way to lower taxes, saving Americans trillions they now pay every year.
  • Reduced spending will limit the government’s ability to impose regulations, making it easier to open, expand, and operate businesses in the U.S.
  • The Fed keeps interest rates artificially low so politicians can continue to spend recklessly and rack up debt.
  • Allowing the free market to set interest rates will rein in government overspending.
  • Allowing the market to set interest rates will reduce the risk of more housing bubbles.
  • Free market interest rates will allow seniors on fixed incomes to earn income on CDs (certificates of deposit) and bonds rather than risk their life savings in volatile, risky stocks.
  • Taking away the Fed’s license to incur debt and print money will stabilize the dollar, putting a halt to endlessly-rising costs of food, housing, and other essentials.
  • A stable dollar will allow seniors to retire in comfort.
  • A stable dollar will allow businesses and individuals to plan more efficiently and reduce risk.
  • By making the dollar the only legal tender, politicians shield themselves from the competition of other forms of currency such as gold or Bitcoin. This gives them more license to overspend recklessly.
  • Allowing Bitcoin, gold, silver, and other commodities to be used as currency will force politicians to stop overspending.
  • Market-driven monetary policies will lower the threat of an economic depression or collapse.
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Never Expand Big Government

“If elected, I will vote “no” and work against any measure that expands government authority in any way or that increases total government spending from today’s astronomically high levels. If an essential, constitutional government function is needed, I will vote to reduce spending elsewhere to pay for it, rather than raise taxes or add to the nation’s debt.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Richard Longstreth, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Colorado
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Jason Lebeck, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota

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Why we should never expand big government

  • When politicians propose to expand government, as they routinely do, they claim they need more money and more authority, pretending there’s little to no government waste they can cut instead.
  • But according to a 2014 Gallup poll, Americans believe: 51 percent of what federal politicians spend is waste; 42 percent of what state politicians spend is waste; and 37 percent of what local politicians spend is waste.
  • In other words, politicians spend THREE TRILLIONS DOLLARS ($2 trillion federal plus $1 trillion state and local) of taxpayers’ hard-earned money on government waste. Every year.
  • Every time politicians raise total government spending or expand government authority, Americans pay a steep price in lost wealth and diminished freedoms
  • Expanding government enriches special interests on the backs of everyday taxpayers
  • Americans are already heavily burdened by hundreds of federal, state, and local taxes. Politicians tax about half of all earnings in American.
  • Citizens and businesses are already heavily burdened by thousands of regulations, mandates, and prohibitions.
  • We must remove thousands of government regulations from the books and allow the marketplace to regulate safely, effectively and efficiently. We must never add more regulations.
  • We must dramatically reduce total taxes and total government spending, and never increase them.
  • We must look for ways to pay down the nation’s unsustainable debt, not add to it.
  • By removing waste and managing government budgets properly, there is never a need for more government.
  • Stopping the assault of imposing more Big Government on the American people will force politicians to be financially responsible, allow people to keep their desperately-needed, hard-earned money, and restore essential freedoms.
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Require Government Financial Transparency

“Government should be at least as transparent as anyone it regulates, including citizens subject to an IRS audit, businesses harassed by government regulators, and political campaigns subject to FEC regulations. Therefore, if elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to put the government’s checkbook online. Each government transaction must cite as much detail as the IRS demands of citizens. Government agencies that refuse to fully and promptly disclose their finances will lose their funding, and taxes will be cut by the amount saved.”

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Libertarians for U.S. House of Representatives who made the pledge:

Joe Cobb, U.S. House of Representatives District 7, Arizona
Jeffery Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Arizona
Nolan Daniels, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Arizona
Mark West, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Arkansas
Scott Gesty, U.S. House of Representatives, Delaware
Rob Lapham, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Florida
Andrew “Andy” Horning, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Indiana
Steven Mayoras, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Indiana
Kerry S. Burt, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Kansas
James Houston Bales, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Kansas
Jim Bouchard, U.S. House of Representatives District 1 (write-in), Maine
Kristin Kasprzak, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Maryland
Jason Summers, U.S. House of Representatives District 5, Maryland
Thomas Simmons, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Massachusetts
Lisa Gioia, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Michigan
Erwin Haas, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Michigan
Chase Wilson, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, Mississippi
Jonathan L. Shell, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, Missouri
Dan Hogan, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Missouri
Russ Monchil, U.S. House of Representatives District 6, Missouri
Mark Bliss, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Missouri
Dan Delaney, U.S. House of Representatives District 8, New Jersey
John Ordille, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, New Jersey
Jeff Hetrick, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, New Jersey
William “Bill” Sihr IV, U.S. House of Representatives District 1, New Jersey
Anthony D’Orazio, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, New York
Ebert Beeman, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Pennsylvania
Shawn Patrick House, U.S. House of Representatives District 16, Pennsylvania
Ross Lynn Leone, U.S. House of Representatives District 15, Texas
William “Bill” Kelsey, U.S. House of Representatives District 10, Texas
Scott Jameson, U.S. House of Representatives District 3, Texas
Mike Kolls, U.S. House of Representatives District 24, Texas
Mark Boler, U.S. House of Representatives District 26, Texas
Ruben S. Corvalan, U.S. House of Representatives District 23, Texas
Nicholas Landholt, U.S. House of Representatives District 11, Texas
Jeffrey C. Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives District 20, Texas
Ed Rankin, U.S. House of Representatives District 32, Texas
Troy Bonar, U.S. House of Representatives District 19, Texas
Calvin DeWeese, U.S. House of Representatives District 13, Texas
Loren Marc Schneiderman, U.S. House of Representatives District 25, Texas
James B. Veasaw, U.S. House of Representatives District 2, Texas
Clark Patterson, U.S. House of Representatives District 17, Texas
Andy Craig, U.S. House of Representatives District 4, Wisconsin

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Libertarians for U.S. Senate who made the pledge:

Frank Gilbert, U.S. Senate, Arkansas
Gail Lightfoot, U.S. Senate, California
Lily Tang Williams, U.S. Senate, Colorado
Lucy Brenton, U.S. Senate, Indiana
Jonathan Dine, U.S. Senate, Missouri
Alex Merced, U.S. Senate, New York
Robert Marquette, U.S. Senate, North Dakota
Dax Ewbank, U.S. Senate, Oklahoma
Bill Bledsoe, U.S. Senate, South Carolina
Phil Anderson, U.S. Senate, Wisconsin

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Why we should require government financial transparency

  • Politicians demand that taxpayers and businesses divulge their personal finances to tax collectors.
  • At the same time, politicians hide government spending from taxpayers.
  • Some government budgets aren’t even available to the public, or they’re hard to find.
  • Those that are published are often grossly incomplete, confusing or unreadable. They’re not designed to inform, but rather to pull the wool over taxpayers’ eyes.
  • Some government budgets that “break down spending” contain billion-dollar line items, offering no details of how those billions are spent, much less a way to verify their accuracy.
  • Yet politicians demand that taxpayers produce receipts to prove every deductible expense. Hypocrisy at its finest.
  • Some government budgets omit “off-budget spending,” enabling politicians to hide large portions of total government spending from public scrutiny.
  • Government financial transparency will allow citizens to see how their tax dollars are being spent.
  • Government financial transparency will end politician hypocrisy.
  • Government financial transparency will expose the legions of waste in government budgets.
  • Government financial transparency will expose sweetheart deals and embezzlement.
  • Government financial transparency paves the way for cutting unneeded government spending.
  • Government financial transparency will lead to balanced budgets.
  • Government financial transparency will enable meaningful tax cuts, giving back to taxpayers the money they earned to spend, save, or give away as they see fit.
  • Government financial transparency will force government agencies to stop sloppy bookkeeping practices.
  • Government financial transparency will spotlight the fact that federal, state, and local governments, combined, account for about half of all expenditures in the American economy, every year.
  • Government financial transparency will enable voters to see the full impact of legislation and whether their results live up to expectations set by lawmakers.
  • In a free society, anything less than full government financial transparency is an assault on the rights of taxpayers.
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