2016 State Candidate Pledges

See also: Local Candidate Pledges | Federal Candidate Pledges

Dozens of Libertarian candidates for state office pledge to boldly reduce the size, scope, authority, and taxation of Big Government.

The pledges they’ve made are listed below.

Please click the “More” option for each to see the list of 2016 Libertarian candidates who have made the pledge, as well as the benefits and the reasoning behind each measure.

Localize Education

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to reject all federal mandates on and funding for schools in our state, including Common Core and Every Student Succeeds; end all state mandates on local schools; end all regulations and restrictions on private and home schools; close the state Department of Education; and cut taxes by the amount saved.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matt Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Benefits of localizing education

  • Today’s centrally planned education handed down by the federal and state Departments of Education (D.O.E.) drives up the cost of schools and property taxes while worsening educational outcomes.
  • Centrally planned education drowns teachers in red tape, forcing them to spend, on average, two hours every day jumping through bureaucratic hoops — time they could spend helping kids learn.
  • The federal D.O.E. contributes 11 cents of every dollar spent on local schools but imposes 15 cents in strings attached.
  • State and local taxpayers are forced to fund the difference, largely in higher property taxes that drive up rent and the cost of owing a home.
  • Since the D.O.E. began operating in 1980, the per pupil cost of public schooling has risen dramatically.
  • Since the D.O.E. began operating, graduation rates and functional literacy rates in the U.S. have remained low or fallen.
  • Since the D.O.E. began operating, American students have fallen behind over a dozen other countries in average scholastic aptitude testing.
  • After a decade of implementing No Child Left Behind (NCLB), the D.O.E. flunked a test set by its own standards. The Center on Education Policy reported that in 2011, 48 percent of U.S. schools did not meet academic standards set by NCLB.
  • One-size-fits-all schooling ignores the great diversity of individual educationally needs and methods that suit each child.
  • Teachers, parents and local communities know and love their children and have the greatest stake in their receiving a quality education.
  • Localizing education will free teachers to teach as they know best and to provide kids with the education they need for a bright future.
More

End the Failed Drug Prohibition

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to end the drug prohibition; pardon, release from prison, and expunge the records of all non-violent drug ‘offenders’; end arrests and SWAT raids on suspected drug ‘offenders’; and cut taxes by the amount saved. In the interim, immediately reclassify marijuana the same as wine and beer, subject to the same freedoms and responsibilities.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Varpilah K. Chase, Selectboard, Essex, Vermont
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
James Pruden, State House District 86, Kansas
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Max Riekse, State House District 91, Michigan
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matt Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should end the failed War on Drugs

  • The War on Drugs has proven far more deadly and destructive than drugs themselves.
  • Alcohol Prohibition prompted organized crime, consumption of stronger alcoholic drinks, and an epidemic of alcohol overdose deaths.
  • LIkewise, Drug Prohibition has prompted the formation of deadly street gangs, use of stronger drugs, and an increase in drug overdose deaths.
  • Because of the Drug War, the United States incarcerates more people per capita than any country on earth. More than 500,000 Americans are now serving time in jail or prison for drug “offenses.” They are peaceful citizens, separated from their children and families, who could be living productive lives.
  • The incarceration of peaceful drug offenders has cost taxpayers more than $1 trillion since 1971.
  • More than 600,000 people are arrested every year for mere possession of marijuana, diverting attention from where it should be: on violent criminals.
  • Marijuana prohibition denies those suffering from cancer, AIDS, migraines, glaucoma, seizures, and other serious diseases their right to an effective treatment that both reduces suffering and saves lives.
  • Democrats and Republicans enacted the failed War on Drugs, escalated it, and continue to defend it. It is indefensible.
  • Continuing the failed and immoral War on Drugs sends the wrong message to kids:
    – Incarcerate people who have harmed no one else.
    – Deprive people with serious illnesses of the medicine they need.
    – Stubbornly continue failed policies while crime rages and millions suffer.
    – Be hypocrites, drinking alcohol while banning milder substances.
  • Kids can see through this irresponsible message. It encourages them to discredit and disregard good advice.
  • When Drug Prohibition ends, crime will go down dramatically, making our streets and homes safer.
  • People now in prison who never harmed another human being will be free to go home to their families. Their children will grow up with their mom or dad at home.
  • Law enforcement will focus more on finding and prosecuting murderers, rapists, and thieves.
  • Each taxpayer will get back hundreds of dollars — every year — that they now spend on today’s failed prohibition. Money they can save, spend, or give away to others in need.
  • People suffering from cancer, AIDS, and other serious diseases will have dignified and safe access to medical marijuana, giving them their best chance for a long and healthy life.
  • Ending the War on Drugs sends the right message to kids:
    – Be personally responsible.
    – Be just, be reasonable, and honor individual rights.
    – Admit mistakes and get rid of bad laws that don’t work.
    – End unnecessary human suffering.
More

Fully Restore the Right of Self-Defense

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to repeal all state laws that abridge an individual’s right of self-defense and remove this obstacle to citizens who can prevent or stop mass shootings.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Varpilah K. Chase, Selectboard, Essex, Vermont
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Max Riekse, State House District 91, Michigan
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matt Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Karl Tatgenhorst, Lieutenant Governor, Indiana
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should fully restore the right of self-defense

  • The right of self-defense both deters and thwarts crime, minimizing the harm that criminals can inflict on innocent, law-abiding citizens.
  • There is no such thing as a “gun-free” zone. Murderers don’t care about gun regulations. They take guns wherever they please. Only innocent, law-abiding citizens obey such laws, leaving them defenseless.
  • There are only two types of zones possible: one where bad guys go unchallenged, and one where law-abiding citizens can take them down.
  • Taking away the right of self-defense puts innocent men, women, and children in harm’s way.
  • Anti-gun laws result in more violence: more murders, more rape, more assault, more muggings, more home invasions, and more theft.
  • Violent crime rates are lower in areas where citizens have the right to keep and bear arms.
  • Blaming guns for murder is like blaming pencils for misspellings.
  • Repealing anti-self-defense laws will make America safer.
  • To reduce violence even more, end drug prohibition. The majority of violent crimes are linked to the War on Drugs.
More

Nullify and Void Bureaucratic Regulations

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to nullify and void all regulations, laws, and restrictions generated by state government bureaucracies.”

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Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Max Riekse, State House District 91, Michigan
Matt Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we must nullify and void bureaucracy-mandated regulations

  • Politicians grant vast powers to thousands of bureaucracies at all levels of government.
  • Bureaucrats impose millions of regulations on Americans that were not put to a vote by elected bodies.
  • People and businesses cannot possibly keep abreast of, much less comply with, today’s high volume of government regulations. This makes criminals out of ordinary citizens.
  • The average American unwittingly commits three felonies every day due to government over-regulation.
  • By requiring congress to vote on every regulation, and getting rid of those not put to a vote, the volume will go down to a much more reasonable and manageable level.
  • Government regulations drown businesses and citizens in red tape, causing waste and frustration.
  • Government regulations force Americans to spend $3-4 trillion every year for compliance. This is the cost of bookkeeping, financial advisers, lawyers, armies of bean counters, and the inefficiencies that regulations cause.
  • Most government regulations are not needed. Where they don’t exist, free market regulations step in to keep products and services safe, effective, and competitively priced.
  • Market regulators take many forms including media watchdogs, customer feedback and ratings for products and services, user forums, and professional societies that certify suppliers.
  • For example, Underwriters Laboratory (UL) sets standards for electrical safety. Virtually every electrical vendor conforms to UL standards. No government was involved in UL’s formation or its decades of success.
  • Government regulations are typically outdated, wasteful, clumsy and nonsensical. They make products and services less safe, sometimes even dangerous.
  • Market regulations respond quickly to changes in the marketplace and result in much better, safer products and services.
  • The high cost of government bureaucracies raises government spending, taxes, and debt.
  • Getting rid of bureaucracies will enable dramatic reductions in government spending, tax cuts, and less government debt.
  • Government regulations kill millions of American jobs.
  • Getting rid of regulations will make it easy for small businesses to open and expand, creating jobs. An economic boom will result.
  • Government regulations drive up the cost of food, clothing, household items, and virtually everything Americans buy.
  • Removing government regulations will allow U.S. businesses to lower prices for consumers.
  • Over-regulation makes American businesses unable to compete in world markets.
  • Getting rid of regulations will make America competitive.
  • Bureaucracies that mandate regulations often enforce them as well, violating individual rights and due process.
  • Nullifying and voiding bureaucratic regulations will restore due process, protecting individual rights.
More

End Cruelty to the Dying

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to immediately legalize assisted suicide and to end all restrictions on medical treatments, including experimental drugs, for those who are terminally ill.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Varpilah K. Chase, Selectboard, Essex, Vermont
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
James Pruden, State House District 86, Kansas
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Karl Tatgenhorst, Lieutenant Governor, Indiana
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we must end cruelty to the dying

  • People in their last days on earth are often forced to suffer severe disability and intense pain and discomfort.
  • It is cruel and inhumane to deprive them the option to relieve their suffering.
  • Politicians who claim that the government should prohibit a person who’s dying from using an experimental drug because it may be “unsafe” is ludicrous. A dying person is already as unsafe as they can be.
  • The government has no right to stand in the way of someone who’s terminally ill from trying any means they can to save their own life.
  • Lobbyists have opposed assisted suicide on behalf of greedy medical profiteers and Big Pharma, who are more interested in making a buck from prolonging the life of the sick and feeble than allowing them an alternative to extreme suffering.
  • In a free society, every individual should be free to choose their own destiny, so long as they harm no one else.
More

Expand Health Freedom to Make it Affordable, Safe, and Effective

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to:

• Refuse to implement Obamacare mandates.

• End all state mandates on individuals and businesses to buy medical insurance.

• End all coverage mandates and restrictions on health insurance that prevent companies from selling policies that customers want to buy; dismantle the office of the state Insurance Commissioner; and allow purchase of medical insurance plans across state lines. Existing policies will be honored until the free market is restored.

• Stop bailing out insurance companies by ending all risk corridors, risk pools, and other forms of bailouts.

• End all state regulations that restrict use, or that drive up the cost, of drugs, medical procedures, medical supplies and equipment, office visits, or laboratory tests. This includes restoring the right of medical providers to publicize their prices; replacing state-controlled medical licensing with free-market certification; and ending restrictions on self-care.

• End any restrictions or prohibitions on free clinics and other forms of charitable health care.

• Once the market has been freed, charitable services are available for the poor, and prices plummet, gradu ally end Medicaid and all other state health-care programs and subsidies, which will no longer be needed. Dramatically cut taxes by the amount saved.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matt Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should replace Big Government Medicine with health freedom

  • Government regulations, red tape, mandates, and subsidies drive up the cost of medical care astronomically. Americans pay perhaps five to ten times more for medical care and medical insurance than necessary.
  • In a competitive marketplace free of government interference, health-care costs would plummet to a fraction of what Americans spend today.
  • Low-cost, efficient medical providers would emerge, such as “Stitches R Us” or “Surgeries R Us,” which would offer easily-affordable options for routine procedures.
  • Many people wouldn’t need or want insurance, because even catastrophic care would be affordable for them.
  • For others, catastrophic care insurance would cost a fraction of today’s premiums.
  • Out-of-pocket costs for office visits, drugs, lab tests, and procedures would be a fraction of what Americans pay today.
  • Low prices would enable phasing out of Medicaid, the biggest budget-buster in state spending. This would enable dramatic reductions in state taxes.
  • With greater competition, the quality, safety and convenience of health care services would surge.
  • Patients would be far better informed.
  • Patients would be in full control of their health care, with the option of delegating that control to whomever they choose.
  • Today, thousands of government bureaucrats and their assigns have access to Americans’ personal medical records.
  • In a free-market health system, patients would have full control over their medical privacy.
  • The quality of health care would rise dramatically, while the frequency of medical malpractice would diminish.
  • Better quality health care would result in less suffering, shorter waits for medical treatment, better outcomes, and longer, healthier lives.
  • Medical research would accelerate discovery of cures and treatments for human disease, resulting in longer lives and less suffering.
  • People suffering from disease, including the terminally ill, would be free to use experimental drugs, giving them every chance to live long and healthy lives.
  • Lobbyists representing medical insurance companies, pharmaceuticals, or medical cartels would have no business in state capitals. Instead, health-care delivery would be driven by the needs of patients who seek to maximize their health and by businesses and charities that fulfill those needs.
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End Asset Forfeiture ("policing for profit")

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to prohibit the state and local governments from freezing or taking citizens’ assets without (1) charging the alleged offender with a crime and (2) proving property is subject to forfeiture by ‘clear and convincing’ evidence. No assets seized by government may be retained by any department for its own use; instead, they must be transferred to the general fund.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Varpilah K. Chase, Selectboard, Essex, Vermont
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
James Pruden, State House District 86, Kansas
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matt Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Karl Tatgenhorst, Lieutenant Governor, Indiana
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut

Benefits of ending asset forfeiture (“policing for profit”)

  • Today, police can take possession of your car, your home, your bank account, and anything else you own when suspected of a crime.
  • Seizing of citizens’ assets has become so widespread that today, police take more property from American citizens (over $5 billion every year) than thieves do.
  • Without arresting you, much less charging you with a crime or proving your guilt, they can seize your possessions, forcing you to get a lawyer. You’re guilty until proven innocent.
  • The legal cost of recovering your assets can easily run higher than the value of the property that the police confiscated, forcing you to accept the loss, even if you did nothing wrong.
  • In a practice dubbed policing for profit, police departments that seize assets are permitted to keep the spoils. This gives cops a perverse incentive to take your property without due process.
  • Many police departments depend on seizing your assets to fund their budgets.
  • Seventeen states require clear and convincing evidence, or impose a higher standard, to seize property. New Mexico has completely outlawed asset forfeiture. All other states should do the same.
  • Ending asset forfeiture will prevent police officers and their superiors from being tempted to seize on the assets of citizens without due process.
  • Ending asset forfeiture will restore justice.
More

Replace Privileged Government Pensions with Social Security

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to move all government employees and retirees from privileged, lucrative government pensions into Social Security and to cut taxes by the amount saved. If it’s good enough for the people of our state, it’s good enough for government employees.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should replace privileged government pensions with Social Security

  • Many government employee pensions are sweetheart deals.
  • In contrast, Social Security leaves millions of private-sector retirees, who must pay for the lucrative retirement packages of government employees, in poverty.
  • Politicians gouge the paychecks of private sector workers. They must pay the 7.65% FICA tax, as do their employers.
  • Self-employed Americans must pay 15.3% in FICA tax on their earnings.
  • Politicians levy the FICA tax on top of federal, state, and local income taxes.
  • For many working class Americans, the FICA tax is the highest tax they pay.
  • Many state and local government workers are exempt from paying the FICA tax. Others pay it but also receive a special government worker retirement benefit. Many of them, especially those close to retirement or in retirement, have contributed relatively little towards their own retirement.
  • Private-sector workers would be far better off saving or investing the money they and their employer must pay in FICA taxes for a comfortable and secure retirement. But politicians allow this only for certain government workers. This isn’t fair.
  • Every year, politicians raid the Social Security Trust Fund to pay for bloated government spending, squandering the money entrusted to them for the retirement of private-sector employees.
  • Politicians don’t touch the retirement funds of government workers. Government pensions are funded, on average, 80% nationwide (over $5 trillion saved) and are relatively secure.
  • American workers should not have to pay to ensure government employee retirements are funded when their own fund is broke.
  • Private-sector workers who depend on Social Security may retire at age 66 or 67 to receive full benefits.
  • Many government workers are eligible to retire on full benefits at age 62 or younger, depending on the agency they work for.
  • There’s no reason government workers should retire earlier than the private-sector employees who pay for their retirement.
  • Many government retirees get lucrative, automatic cost of living adjustment (COLA) increases every year.
  • Social security payouts increase at the pleasure of Congress, which tends to raise payouts only every few years.
  • Private-sector workers on Social Security who have no protection against inflation should not have to fund government workers’ COLA increases.
  • Many full-time government workers get pensions of $50,000 per year or more.
  • The maximum private sector payout for retirees on Social Security is $25,224 per year if retired at age 62; $31,668 if retired at 66 (soon to increase to 67); and $42,912 if retired at age 70.
  • Some government workers who retire in their early sixties get paid four times more than the maximum Social Security payout of those who retire at age 70.
  • There’s no justification for forcing private-sector workers, many of whom will retire in poverty, to pay for lucrative government-employee pensions.
  • Government retirees also typically get generous health-care benefits.
  • Many government retirees also get large lump-sum payments for unused sick days and vacation time.
  • The inequity between government pensions and Social Security payouts is not just grossly inequitable in one way (payouts). It’s inequitable and unfair insix additional ways: (1) Age of retirement, (2) amounts workers pay into retirement, (3) saved funds that back the payout, (4) automatic COLA increases, (5) medical benefits, and (6) accrued vacation and sick leave payouts.
  • Private-sector workers should not have to pay for lucrative, government-retiree perks.
  • Replacing lucrative government worker retirement deals with the same deal that private-sector workers get on Social Security will restore fairness.
  • Retirement fairness will reduce a huge liability for current and future taxpayers.
  • Retirement fairness will reduce the incentive for lobbyists to protect millions of unneeded government jobs, reducing taxes and deficits.
More

Replace Government Licensing with Market Regulation

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to end state-protected cartels by removing all restrictions on practicing in any profession. This includes allowing free-market certification to replace state-controlled licensing and restoring the right of all service providers to advertise and to publicize their prices.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Karl Tatgenhorst, Lieutenant Governor, Indiana
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should replace government licensing with market regulation

  • Government-granted licensing breeds cronyist cartels that are among the most powerful lobby organizations in the U.S.
  • Cartel lobbyists serve the needs of their members, not consumers, and exert undue influence over politicians.
  • Cartel lobbyists work to block and outlaw their competition, restricting consumers’ choices.
  • Cartel lobbyists work to secure government contracts and other special favors at taxpayer expense.
  • Government licensing allows incompetent providers to continue their practice when they should be put out of business.
  • Government licensing leads to artificial shortages, which drive up the price of services.
  • Educational requirements set by government-mandated licensing boards often miss the mark, imposing years of costly, unproductive and often unnecessary schooling, while neglecting to ensure practitioners have all the training they need to be effective.
  • How and where to be trained for a profession should be left up to the individual to decide. This will allow for a great variety of learning and training methodologies, which leads to adoption of best practices.
  • Market regulation, including professional society certification and customer feedback, does a far superior job of weeding out unsafe and unqualified providers than government-mandated licensing.
  • Market regulation keeps prices competitive.
  • Market regulation holds providers to account for their performance and qualifications throughout their careers, not just when they initially qualify.
  • Ending state licensing will create millions of jobs for qualified individuals.
  • Ending state licensing will drive down prices of services.
  • Ending state licensing will improve safety and quality of services.
More

Immediately End Police Militarization

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to prohibit the acquisition, ownership, or use of military-grade equipment by state/local police.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
James Pruden, State House District 86, Kansas
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Max Riekse, State House District 91, Michigan
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida

Why immediately end police militarization

  • Police forces around the United States are becoming dangerously militarized in both tactics and equipment.
  • The federal government sells military surplus to local governments — including armored personnel carriers, rocket-propelled grenades, and tactical equipment.
  • Police perform SWAT raids on homes of suspected drug offenders. Sometimes they enter the wrong house. Sometimes they shoot and kill innocent Americans.
  • Police should be peacekeepers who protect the people of their communities and serve them with respect, not as an occupying army.
  • Ending police militarization will take away the pretext for excessive use of force and leave police with just one crime-fighting mandate: go after only those who pose a real threat to others.
  • In Ferguson, Missouri, the police used armored vehicles and imposed an undeclared martial law, not allowing citizens to stand in one spot for more than 5 seconds. No ordinance was passed, nor were there any orders from any chief executive with the authority to impose such a restriction. The police took it upon themselves to enforce, with automatic weapons, a nonexistent law.
  • This led to unrest and racial tension that continues to reverberate throughout America.
  • Ending police militarization will reduce tension, reduce unrest, and make American communities safer.
More

Eliminate the State Income Tax

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to eliminate the state income tax and return every dollar to taxpayers by cutting state spending by an equal amount.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas

Why end the state income tax and cut state spending

  • Ending the income tax gives back, on average, thousands of dollars to each family in the state — every year — that they can invest, save, spend, or give away as they see fit.
  • Ending the income tax moves billions of dollars out of the bloated, wasteful government sector and into the productive, private-sector economy. This will stimulate massive investment in small businesses and create millions of new private-sector jobs.
  • It forces politicians to eliminate destructive state programs, regulations, and bureaucracies that do more harm than good. Examples include: stifling regulations on businesses and charities, the marijuana prohibition, and mandates on schools that drive up property taxes and hamstring teachers’ ability to teach.
  • Ending the income tax creates a boom in charitable giving. Billions of dollars back in the hands of taxpayers enable them to take care of others in need through their churches and private charities, and by giving directly to help friends, family, and community members in need.
  • Ending the income tax eliminates wasteful bookkeeping and red tape required to comply with tax filings and audits, saving citizens of the state millions of hours of their precious time and billions of dollars in compliance costs — every year.
  • It frees up millions of dollars for taxpayers to spend on music, entertainment, crafts, and the arts, enabling talented individuals who are now unemployed or working in jobs they don’t like, to pursue doing what they love for a living.
  • It forces politicians to eliminate government waste and live on trimmed-down budgets, just as families and business must do.
More

Eliminate the State Sales Tax

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to eliminate the state sales tax and return every dollar to taxpayers by cutting state spending by an equal amount.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida

Why eliminate the state sales tax

  • Ending the sales tax will give back hundreds or thousands of dollars to each family in the state — every year — that they can invest, save, spend, or give away as they see fit.
  • Ending the sales tax will cut the cost of buying a car by hundreds of dollars.
  • Ending the sales tax will move billions of dollars out of the bloated, wasteful government sector and into the productive, private-sector economy. This will stimulate investment in small businesses and create thousands of new private-sector jobs.
  • Ending the sales tax will force politicians to eliminate government waste.
  • Ending the sales tax will force politicians to eliminate destructive government programs, regulations, and bureaucracies that do more harm than good. Examples include: stifling regulations on businesses, the failed marijuana prohibition, and mandates on schools that drive up property taxes.
  • Ending the sales tax will create a boom in charitable giving. Billions of dollars back in the hands of taxpayers will enable them to take care of others in need through their churches and private charities, and by giving directly to help friends, family, and community members in need.
  • Ending the sales tax will eliminate wasteful bookkeeping and red tape imposed on small businesses, freeing resources that can be used to provide better products and services while creating more new jobs.
  • Ending the sales tax will free up millions of dollars for taxpayers to spend on music, entertainment, crafts, and the arts, enabling talented individuals who are now unemployed or working in jobs they don’t like, to pursue doing what they love for a living.
  • Ending the sales tax will attract customers to retail businesses in the state, which helps retailers to thrive, hire, and stay in business.
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Impose Term Limits

“If elected, I will sponsor and work diligently to pass legislation to impose term limits on elected state officials.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
James Pruden, State House District 86, Kansas
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should term-limit elected state officials

  • Incumbent politicians have numerous advantages over challengers, including name recognition, seniority, franking privileges, and large war chests funded by special interests.
  • As a result, many politicians become deeply entrenched and near impossible to unseat removing their need to compete in elections. Sometimes they refuse to debate their opponents.
  • A growing number of incumbents go completely unchallenged. No other names appear on the ballot for their race.
  • Lack of competition in elections for public office severely undermines democracy, giving voters very little say in policy decisions.
  • Long-term incumbents grant undue influence to special interests due to the deep ties they establish with their lobbyists. This further diminishes the influence of everyday Americans.
  • Long-term incumbents develop ties with mainstream media, giving both incumbents and media elitists more influence in elections. This also diminishes the influence of everyday voters.
  • Imposing term limits will foster competition and representative government that serves the people, not special interests.
  • Term limits are a reasonable and necessary restraint on government power.
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Never Expand Big Government

“If elected, I will vote ‘no’ and work against any measure that expands government authority in any way or that increases total government spending from today’s high levels. If an essential, constitutional government function is needed, I will vote to reduce spending elsewhere to pay for it rather than raise taxes or increase government debt.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Max Riekse, State House District 91, Michigan
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

Why we should never expand big government

  • When politicians propose to expand government, as they routinely do, they claim they need more money and more authority, pretending there’s little to no government waste they can cut instead.
  • But according to a 2014 Gallup poll, Americans believe: 51 percent of what federal politicians spend is waste; 42 percent of what state politicians spend is waste; and 37 percent of what local politicians spend is waste.
  • In other words, politicians spend THREE TRILLION DOLLARS ($2 trillion federal plus $1 trillion state and local) of taxpayers’ hard-earned money on government waste. Every year.
  • Every time politicians raise total government spending or expand government authority, Americans pay a steep price in lost wealth and diminished freedoms
  • Expanding government enriches special interests on the backs of everyday taxpayers
  • Americans are already heavily burdened by hundreds of federal, state, and local taxes. Politicians tax about half of all earnings in America.
  • Citizens and businesses are already heavily burdened by thousands of regulations, mandates, and prohibitions.
  • We must remove thousands of government regulations from the books and allow the marketplace to regulate safely, effectively and efficiently. We must never add more regulations.
  • We must dramatically reduce total taxes and total government spending, and never increase them.
  • By removing waste and managing government budgets properly, there is never a need for more government.
  • Stopping the assault of imposing more Big Government on the American people will force politicians to be financially responsible, allow people to keep their desperately-needed, hard-earned money, and restore essential freedoms.
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Require Government Financial Transparency

“Government should be at least as transparent as anyone it regulates, including citizens and businesses subjected to an IRS audit. Therefore, if elected, I will sponsor and work tirelessly to pass legislation to ‘put the government’s checkbook online’ — with consequences for noncompliance. Published financial data must be clear, well-organized and easy to find. Each government transaction must cite as much detail as the IRS demands of citizens. Government agencies that refuse to fully, clearly, and promptly disclose their finances will lose their funding, and taxes will be cut by the amount saved.”

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Erin Adams, State House District 33, Oklahoma
Cecil Anderson, State House 3, Arkansas
Kenneth Anton, State Assembly District 2, California
James R. Apker, State Senate District 3, Washington
Garry Baker, State House District 44, Arkansas
Seth Bartmess, State House District 32, Iowa
Jeanne Bojarski, State Senate District 7, Missouri
Grant Brand, State House District 95, Arkansas
Rick Brown, State House District 53, Indiana
Baron Bruno, State Assembly District 62, California
Chris Burros, State House District 132, Missouri
Austin Coco, State House District 35, Connecticut
Jacki Cole, Lt. Governor, North Carolina
Josh Daniels, State House District 43, Montana
Judith Darcy, State House District 20, Colorado
Michelle Darnell, State House District 48 Position 1, Washington
Clifford “Cliff” Deuvall, State House District 56, Texas
Shane Driscoll, State House District 38 Position 2, Washington
Ted Dunlap, Governor, Montana
Ben Easton, State House District 48, Texas
Dan Elder, State House District 79, Missouri
Jon Elgas, State House District 42, Michigan
Ryan Evelyth, State House District 46, North Dakota
Mike Everling, State Assembly District 51, California
Fred Fogel, State Senate District 2, Hawaii
Joey Frazier, State House District 71, Kansas
Jocelyn Fry, State House District 35, Iowa
John George, State House District 76, Michigan
John George, State Senate District 38, Iowa
James P. Gillen II, State House District 7, Indiana
Kevin Gulbranson, State House District 56, Colorado
Glenn A. Gustitus, State House District 12, Missouri
Nic Haag, State Senate District 44, North Carolina
Jordan Hansen, State Assembly District 54, Wisconsin
Brad Hessel, State Senate District 15, North Carolina
Dean “Draig” Hodge, State House District 65, Missouri
Anthony Holan, State House District 114, Texas
Brian Holk, State House District 53, Texas
Tom Howell, State House District 46, North Carolina
Charles Matt Hull, State House District 103, Missouri
Glenn Ingalls, State House District 60, Colorado
John Inks, State Assembly District 24, California
Brian Irving, State House District 36, North Carolina
Joe Johnson, State House District 63, Colorado
Kevin Johnson, State House District 16, North Dakota
Shawn W. Jones, State House District 66, Texas
Michael Kalagias, State House District 96, Arkansas
Barry F. Keaveney, State Senate District 7, Arizona
Thomas Keister, State House District 71, Indiana
Michael Kerner, State Senate District 21, Kansas
Jacob Lamont, State House District 42 Position 1, Washington
Artie Lurie, State House District 90, Florida
Douglas McNaughton, State House District 90, Indiana
Joshua Miller, State House District 78, Iowa
Mark A. Miller, Railroad Commissioner, Texas
David Moran, Governor, West Virginia
Evan A. Nagel, State House District 18, Texas
Luke Nicholson, State House District 55, Pennsylvania
Christopher Olson, State House District 61, Arkansas
Rick Perkins, State House District 49, Texas
Michele Poague, State Senate District 29, Colorado
James Pruden, State House District 86, Kansas
Rich Purtell, State Senate District 52, New York
Susan Quilleash, State House District 17, Colorado
Donald Rainwater, State Senate District 20, Indiana
Max Riekse, State House District 91, Michigan
Honor “Mimi” Robson, State Senate District 33, California
Matthew Schutter, State House District 122, Pennsylvania
Tracy Scott, State House District 97, Missouri
Michael Seebeck, State House District 21, Colorado
Leah Sees, State House District 92, Texas
Nick Serianni, State Senate District 6, Iowa
Bryan Simonson, State Senate District 41, Washington
Bill Slantz, State Senate District 23, Missouri
Cisse Spragins, Governor, Missouri
Kim Tavendale, State House District 33, Colorado
Joshua Voytek, Lieutenant Governor, North Dakota
Olen Watson, State House District 38, North Carolina
William Truman “Bill” Wayne, State Senate District 21, Missouri
Wayne Willems, State House District 15, Arkansas
Ken Willey, State House District 18, Florida
Bob Wilson, State House District 7, Delaware

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Why we should require government financial transparency

  • Politicians demand that taxpayers and businesses divulge their personal finances to tax collectors.
  • At the same time, politicians hide government spending from taxpayers.
  • Some government budgets aren’t even available to the public, or they’re hard to find.
  • Those that are published are often grossly incomplete, confusing or unreadable. They’re not designed to inform, but rather to pull the wool over taxpayers’ eyes.
  • Some government budgets that “break down spending” contain billion-dollar line items, offering no details of how those billions are spent, much less a way to verify their accuracy.
  • Yet politicians demand that taxpayers produce receipts to prove every deductible expense. Hypocrisy at its finest.
  • Some government budgets omit “off-budget spending,” enabling politicians to hide large portions of total government spending from public scrutiny.
  • Government financial transparency will allow citizens to see how their tax dollars are being spent.
  • Government financial transparency will end politician hypocrisy.
  • Government financial transparency will expose the legions of waste in government budgets.
  • Government financial transparency will expose sweetheart deals and embezzlement.
  • Government financial transparency paves the way for cutting unneeded government spending.
  • Government financial transparency will lead to balanced budgets.
  • Government financial transparency will enable meaningful tax cuts, giving back to taxpayers the money they earned to spend, save, or give away as they see fit.
  • Government financial transparency will force government agencies to stop sloppy bookkeeping practices.
  • Government financial transparency will spotlight the fact that federal, state, and local governments, combined, account for about half of all expenditures in the American economy, every year.
  • Government financial transparency will enable voters to see the full impact of legislation and whether their results live up to expectations set by lawmakers.
  • In a free society, anything less than full government transparency is an assault on the rights of taxpayers.
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